Drinkwater & Schriver Flour Mill

$79.00$99.00

Signature Edition Print

Beautiful fine art print personally printed by Brad.
Printer/Ink: Canon Pro 10 / Lucia pigment archival inks.
Paper: Canon Fine Art Smooth 320gsm. Beautiful silky smooth matte paper.

  • All prints signed and include a certificate of authenticity.
  • Free shipping on all special edition prints. (within the continental U.S.)
    • If you require an alternative size please contact us.
SKU: Drinkwater & Schriver Flour Mill - FHFA_8353 Category:

Description

Drinkwater & Schriver Flour Mill

Photographic Story~

The Drinkwater & Schriver Flour Mill on the Cottonwood River in Cedar Point, Kansas operated for about 100 years. The grist mill produced flour for both the local area and eastern bakeries. It was started as a sawmill built by Cedar Point Postmaster, O.H. Drinkwater in 1867. With the assistance of Peter Paul Schriver, the original wooden sawmill and dam was replaced by these stone structures in 1875.

On a wonderful early Autumn day, I ventured down hwy 177 to US 50 West. Heading west approximately 18 miles you come to what appears to be just a small little side road on the south side of US 50. This road just happens to be 1st street. I believe it still has the street sign stating so. This is 1st street that takes you approximately 1/2 miles into the small Kansas town of Cedar Point. Not much remains of Cedar Point these days. A few buildings still line a short main street along with the post office. 

To get to main street you must first cross the spawling Cottonwood River. As you approach the bridge you will suddenly notice, just to the right and on the south side of the Cottonwood River, a magnificent old stone structure. This is the Drinkwater & Schriver Flour Mill.

Upon your first visit, you will be amazed at the sight of this multistory stone structure perched directly on the edge of the Cottonwood River. I have no doubt it was quite a spectacle in its prime. 

The mill sold flour from 1875 until 1941 when the machinery was converted to grinding cattle feed. The Drinkwater & Schriver mill ground feed into the 1960s but has been unused since that time. The mill was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2007.

 

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